True Mirrors Mended With The Gold Of Love

“If People Were Mirrors”, a timely piece by (or of?) Andréana Lefton is so beautiful and meaningful, I had to print it so i can reflect on it more later. Read it and reflect on it too, as an encouragement to be true mirrors to ourselves and others…

What if people were true mirrors?

What if a man looked at a woman, and saw himself – or at least those parts of himself he would never imagine trusting or acknowledging in the light of day?

What if a white woman looked at a black man, and saw herself – or at least those parts of herself she would never share or seek to encounter on the street?

What if a ballet dancer looked at a girl in a wheelchair, and saw herself – or at least those parts of herself that give her the courage to face injury with every practice and performance?

What if a beautiful woman looked at another beautiful woman, and saw herself – or at least those parts of herself that she doubts, fears, and fights?

What a teacher looked at a child, and saw himself – or at least those parts of himself that ache for love, acceptance, total, uncompromising support?

What if a child looked at another child, and saw herself – or at least those parts of herself that are pure and confused and exuberant?

True Mirrors Mended With The Gold of Love

We can indeed experience the beauty and bitterness of life as One, if we heed this gentle voice inviting us to truly see who we are: true mirrors mended with the gold of love, beautiful beyond… despite… because of our Japanese-pottery-like fractures!

Kintsukuroi (“golden mend”) is the Japanese art of mending broken pottery using lacquer resin laced with gold or silver and has a deeper philosophical significance. The mended flaws become part of the object’s design, and some people believe the pottery to be even more beautiful having gone through the process of being broken and repaired.

Kintsukuroi (“golden mend”) is the Japanese art of mending broken pottery using lacquer resin laced with gold or silver and has a deeper philosophical significance. The mended flaws become part of the object’s design, and some people believe the pottery to be even more beautiful having gone through the process of being broken and repaired.

Depending on the day, my vision fluctuates in its ability to zoom in on the divine in others and zoom out of my own insignificance or… zoom in on the grandiosity of self and zoom out of compassionate witnessing of others…

It all seems to be a function of my ability to see both the humanity and divinity of others and myself, which in its own turn is a function of my ability to be present each and every moment…

So that I do not miss the opportunity to greet you with Pra??m?sana: “I bow to the divine in you”!

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